Two recent studies demonstrated that the sleep medication ROZEREM (ramelteon) did not affect body sway at peak plasma levels, nor did it impair middle-of-the-night balance, mobility or memory performance in patients who suffer from chronic insomnia. The results of the studies were presented at the 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS).

“These data are important because they show that Rozerem may be a safe sleep medication for the many older adults who worry about their balance when they need to get up in the middle of the night. These studies also showed that the patients’ memories were not affected by Rozerem the next morning,” said Gary Zammit, PhD, director, Sleep Disorders Institute, New York.

Rozerem works differently from other prescription sleep medications. It specifically targets melatonin receptors in an area of the brain believed to be involved in the regulation of the body’s normal sleep-wake cycle. It is the first prescription sleep medication that is not a controlled substance, and has shown no evidence of abuse or dependence in clinical studies.

ROZEREM™ (ramelteon) is indicated for the treatment of insomnia characterized by difficulty with sleep onset. ROZEREM can be prescribed for long-term use. ROZEREM has not been designated as a controlled substance. With the exception of ROZEREM, all other prescription medications indicated for insomnia are classified as Schedule IV controlled substances by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). ROZEREM has a unique therapeutic mechanism of action that selectively targets two melatonin receptors located in the brain’s suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which is known as the body’s “master clock” because it regulates the sleep-wake cycle (Courtesy of Eurekalert).